Wednesday, August 13, 2008

3. how does what we do differentiate us from the other disciplines

Please post your work as a follow-up

5 comments:

Bruce said...

Graphic Designers create visual communication that serves a clients communication needs. This visual communication can take many different forms i.e. print media, digital media and even social media, and more specifically can be in the shape of flat things like brochures/posters or digitally static/animated things or sometimes 3d things like T-shirts and bags. So our point of difference could be that we harvest from many of the other disciplines because what we do is visually communicate to our target markets (on behalf of a client) using whatever means are appropriate to the context.

Johannes Cronje said...

Ok. I like the idea of VISUAL COMMUNICATION. Rather than stuff, it's the messages. That will distinguish us from Surface AND Industrial.

Andrea Broom said...

What differentiates us?

There is commonality in the way all disciplines approach any design need (I prefer the word 'need' to 'problem'). Usually, we are asked as designers (all disciplines) to find a solution to the clients' need ie : need a building, need a covering/textile, need a lump of gold made into a ring, need a dress for the Met, need a chair that flies, etc.
We (all disciplines) go through a process of fully understanding the need, through research in whatever form, and then produce a series of visual suggestions via drawing and digital representation, model making/mock-ups/prototypes. These suggestions are then edited and crafted further, using different production skills.

What graphic designers do, via the same processes, is creatively find ways to persuade people to buy these clients' products/ events/experiences/services/ideas - by any means possible ie: media/experiences/printed/virtual communication/telecommunication - all forms of human interface - all of which are a form of communication.

The power of communication is immense, and it is to be acknowledged here, that our course does not have a purely commercial approach. Inherent in the ethos is that graphic designers or visual communicators that qualify here, learn responsibility and accountability to humanity and to the planet.

Cullen, M. ‘Future Teach (1998) in Heller, S. (Ed), The Education of a Graphic Designer. Allworth, NY.

Andrea Broom said...

What differentiates us?

There is commonality in the way all disciplines approach any design need (I prefer the word 'need' to 'problem').
Usually, we are asked as designers (all disciplines) to find a solution to the clients' need ie : need a building, need a covering/textile, need a lump of gold made into a ring, need a dress for the Met, need a chair that flies, etc.

We (all disciplines) go through a process of fully understanding the need, through research in whatever form, and then produce a series of visual suggestions via drawing and digital representation, model making/mock-ups/prototypes.

These suggestions are then edited and crafted further, using various different production skills.
eg: Smelting, cutting, drilling, weldin... extensive, different skills.

What graphic designers do, via the same processes, is creatively find ways to persuade people to buy these clients' products/ events/experiences/services/ideas - by any means possible ie: media/experiences/printed/virtual communication/telecommunication - all forms of human interface - all of which are a form of communication. Some forms of communication are tangible (artefacts) some are not.

...'(graphic) design becomes more concerned with persuasion than decoration; less about style than about emotion; more about clarity, understanding and context.' (Cullen [Heller (ed)] 1998:32)

The power of communication is immense, and it is to be acknowledged here, that our course does not have a purely commercial approach. Inherent in the ethos is that graphic designers or visual communicators that qualify here, learn responsibility and accountability to humanity and to the planet.

Reference

Cullen, M. ‘Future Teach (1998) in Heller, S. (Ed), The Education of a Graphic Designer. Allworth, NY.

Andrea Broom said...

What differentiates us?

There is commonality in the way all disciplines approach any design need (I prefer the word 'need' to 'problem').
Usually, we are asked as designers (all disciplines) to find a solution to the clients' need ie : need a building, need a covering/textile, need a lump of gold made into a ring, need a dress for the Met, need a chair that flies, etc.

We (all disciplines) go through a process of fully understanding the need, through research in whatever form, and then produce a series of visual suggestions via drawing and digital representation, model making/mock-ups/prototypes.

These suggestions are then edited and crafted further, using various different production skills.
eg: Smelting, cutting, drilling, welding... extensive, different skills.

What graphic designers do, via the same processes, is creatively find ways to persuade people to buy these clients' products/ events/experiences/services/ideas - by any means possible ie: media/experiences/printed/virtual communication/telecommunication - all forms of human interface - all of which are a form of communication. Some forms of communication are tangible (artefacts) some are not.

...'(graphic) design becomes more concerned with persuasion than decoration; less about style than about emotion; more about clarity, understanding and context.' (Cullen [Heller (ed)] 1998:32)

The power of communication is immense, and it is to be acknowledged here, that our course does not have a purely commercial approach. Inherent in the ethos is that graphic designers or visual communicators that qualify here, learn responsibility and accountability to humanity and to the planet.

Reference

Cullen, M. ‘Future Teach (1998) in Heller, S. (Ed), The Education of a Graphic Designer. Allworth, NY.